Modern Furniture, Lighting, and Home Accessories

Always Authentic
202 041 01

Vitra Miniatures B3 Wassily

Brand

vitra miniatures
Starting at: $429.00 CAD
$429.00 CAD

Description

The Miniatures Collection present the most important classics of modern furniture history in miniature in a scale of 1:6. Their construction, materials and colors correspond to the historical Vitra Design Museum collection original, right down to the last detail. MORE INFO
$429.00 CAD
Description

Details

The Miniatures Collection present the most important classics of modern furniture history in miniature in a scale of 1:6. Their construction, materials and colors correspond to the historical Vitra Design Museum collection original, right down to the last detail. Because they are so true to the originals, the miniatures are not only valuable collector's items, but also ideal illustrative material for universities, colleges of designs and architects. The Miniatures Collection is unique worldwide. For each miniature there is a licence agreement with the designer or his heirs. Many designers collaborate with Vitra to develop the miniatures of their own designs and offer their assistance by supplying information on the objects. In return, Vitra honor the designer's copyright by paying royalties.

MEASUREMENTS:

  • Height: 12.3 cm / 4 7/8 inch
  • Width: 12.3 cm / 4 7/8 inch
  • Depth: 11.4 cm / 4 1/2 inch

HELPFUL NOTES:

  • Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet.
  • Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials.
Brand
Vitra Miniatures

Twenty years ago the Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein began making miniature replicas of the great milestones in furniture design housed in its collection. A summary of the history of industrial furniture design – moving from the historic and art nouveau to the new Bauhaus’ radical design, and from postmodernism all the way up until the present day – the collection has grown to include more than 100 pieces. The chairs are all one sixth of the size of the originals. They are all true to scale and replicate the originals right down to the smallest details in construction, material and color.

Designer
Vitra Miniatures B3 Wassily Designed by:
  • Marcel Breuer , 1925
Marcel Breuer

Marcel Breuer

Hungary, 1902 – 1981

Marcel Breuer trained at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany and is heralded as having produced the first tubular steel armchair, his pieces pioneering the demand for tubular steel furniture throughout the 1920s and 1930s. These pieces, along with his innovative laminated wood furniture and his unique architectural interpretation of light and space yielded a great deal of international respect and inspired the work of a wide range of designers.

Breuer studied under Walter Gropius at the Bauhaus from 1920-24. When the Bauhaus moved to Dessau in 1925, Breuer designed furniture for the new campus and became head of the furniture workshop. Also in 1925, Breuer created the famous tubular steel Wassily chair, made for Wassily Kandinsky’s space in Dessau. It made the user look as though they were floating on the seat within the steel cube frame. The chair was innovative in that it was extremely light and was built entirely from ready-made tubes that were welded together.

In 1928 Breuer started a private practice in Berlin and came out with his Cesca cantilever chair, inspired by Mies Van der Rohe. A 1936 molded plywood chair he made inspired the work of the Eames a decade later and his nested tables revisited the form he had produced earlier in steel.

In 1937 Breuer moved to America and worked as an architect with Gropius in Massachusetts. From 1937-1947 he taught architecture at Harvard, and was commissioned by his former student Eliot Noyes to design buildings for IBM.

Breuer is seen as one of the forefathers of the energetic aesthetic of uninhibited experimentation combined with a high standard of artistry that the design industry enjoyed throughout the second half of the century. Breuer retired from active practice in 1976 and died five years later, in 1981.

View More by: Marcel Breuer